Long-awaited Roman silver Denarius of Julia Domna 200 - 211 A.D A.D Rome mi Outlet Styles + Free Shipping

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Roman silver Denarius of Julia Domna 200 - 211 A.D A.D Rome mi
Roman silver Denarius of Julia Domna 200 - 211 A.D  A.D  Rome mi

fabulous Roman Denarius of Julia Domna (Latin: [ˈjuːli.a ˈdomna]; c. 160 – 217 AD) 3.27 g 18 mm was Roman empress consort from 193 to 211. She was born in Emesa (present-day Homs) in Roman Syria to an Arab family of priests of the deity Elagabalus. In 187, she married Libyan-born Septimius Severus, who at the time was governor of the Roman province of Gallia Lugdunensis. They had two sons, Caracalla and Geta. A civil war over the Roman throne broke out in 193, and shortly afterwards Severus declared himself emperor. The war ended in 197 with the defeat of the last of Severus#39;s opponents.
As empress, Domna was famous for her political, social, and philosophical influence. She received titles such as quot;Mother of the Invincible Campsquot;.[a] After the elder of her sons, Caracalla, started ruling with his father, she was briefly co-empress with Caracalla#39;s wife, Fulvia Plautilla, until the latter fell into disgrace. Following the death of Severus in 211, Domna became the first empress dowager to receive the title combination quot;Pia Felix Augustaquot;, which may have implied greater powers being vested in her than what was usual for a Roman empress mother. Her sons succeeded to the throne. They had a conflictual relationship and Domna acted as their mediator, but Caracalla had his brother Geta assassinated later that year.
Domna committed suicide in 217 upon hearing of Caracalla#39;s assassination in the course of his campaign against Parthia, on which she had accompanied him to Antioch (present-day Antakya, Turkey). After the death of Domna, her older sister Julia Maesa successfully contended for political power. The Severan dynasty was restored to power with the accession of Maesa#39;s grandson, Elagabalus, in 218. The dynasty maintained power until 235 when the reign of Severus Alexander, the cousin and successor of Elagabalus, ended. This marked the start of the Crisis of the Third Century.

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